Free Content

ASH regularly produces educational webinars, video series, and podcasts that feature presentations by experts in the field, cover current information on how to best diagnose and care for patients, and topical discussion on issues relevant to hematology. This content is free to stream on ASH On Demand.


Description

Results of robust clinical trials are needed to inform management of and prevent coagulopathies in people with COVID-19. Such studies have been organized within the National Institutes of Health’s Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions (ACTIV) program.
The ACTIV-4 master protocol will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of varying types of blood thinners to treat adults diagnosed with COVID-19. Currently there are three adaptive platform clinical trials within ACTIV-4 that aim to prevent, treat, and address COVID-19-associated coagulopathy (CAC), or clotting, as well as help understand the effects of CAC across three patient populations: inpatient, outpatient, and convalescent. The adaptive nature of the platform will allow a seamless transition to studies that will test multi-regimen anticoagulation approaches.
On this webinar, a leader of the three ACTIV-4 studies will review the goal of the study and the research protocol as well as discuss how sites can become involved in the study. The leaders will also address how the studies intersect with each other as well as other ongoing trials in COVID-19 coagulopathies.

Speakers

  • Moderator: Lisa M. Baumann Kreuziger, MD, Versiti and Medical College of Wisconsin
  • W. Keith Hoots, MD; Director, Division of Blood Diseases and Resources, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health
  • Jeffrey Berger, MD; Co-Principal Investigator, ACTIV-4A; NYU Langone Health
  • Jean M. Connors, MD; Principal Investigator, ACTIV-4B; Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Thomas L. Ortel, MD, PhD; Study Chair, ACTIV-4C; Duke University Medical Center

Description

Within medicine, faculty are commonly asked to write letters of recommendations for colleagues and students. Presented by Dr. Rakesh Mehta, this webinar covers strategies to help faculty organize and develop a strong letter of recommendation. Incorporating participant input, Dr. Mehta will explore the criteria that best communicate a candidate’s strengths and make a candidate stand out. Additionally, Dr. Mehta will shed light on newly developing literature on the implicit biases that can be transmitted through these letters, and will touch on various ways for faculty to avoid potential pitfalls in this area. Lastly, Dr. Mehta will lead attendees in developing an outline of a truly excellent letter of recommendation.

*Updated video with audio will be added once received. Thank you for your patience.

Speakers

  • Rakesh Mehta, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine

Description

According to the National Cancer Institute, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is defined as medical products and practices that are not part of standard medical care. Alternative medicine, such as a specialized diet or other naturopathy, is used in lieu of standard medicine while complementary medicine, such as using acupuncture to help lessen some side effects of cancer treatment, is used along with standard medical treatments. While some CAM therapies, after careful evaluation, have been found to be safe and effective, research on others has been slow due to issues such as time, funding, and the ability to identify willing institutions and researchers. Additionally, some CAM therapies, such as medical marijuana, have run into regulatory hurdles, and there is little communication about CAM use among patients, CAM providers, and hematologists. Nevertheless, CAM is common among hematology patients, who, for example, use the analgesic properties of medical marijuana for cancer and sickle cell disease, but also for many who use these unconventional therapies to gain hope and improve quality of life.
This session will provide information about CAM therapies that may be discussed by patients with their hematologist. Additionally, the session will address the most common questions physicians hear from their patients about CAM therapies and how to conduct a constructive conversation between the physician and patient.

Speakers

  • Moderator: Chancellor E Donald, MD, Chair, ASH Committee on Practice, Tulane University School of Medicine
  • Bipin N. Savani, MD, Vanderbilt University
  • Ilana Braun, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
  • Shawn Seibert, MD, Illinois Cancercare

Description

This webinar provides education on how to evaluate SCD patients in the ED presenting with symptoms concerning for COVID-19 and/or complications of SCD, with SCD-specific considerations for evaluation and treatment.
This webinar was hosted by the American Society of Hematology, the American College of Emergency Physicians, and the Emergency Department Sickle Cell Care Coalition.

Speakers

  • Jeffrey Glassberg, MD, Mt. Sinai, Webinar Chair
  • Caroline Freiermuth, MD, University of Cincinnati
  • Henry W. Young, II, MD, University of Florida
  • Gentry Wilkerson, MD, University of Maryland

Description

Evaluation and assessment comprise core components of medical education. While evaluation seeks to determine the overall caliber of a learner’s performance or an educational curriculum, assessment is a dynamic, active process that seeks to improve learning. Educational frameworks such as Kirkpatrick’s pyramid for evaluating educational outcomes, and Miller’s pyramid for assessing clinical competence, can guide learners and instructors in creating and optimizing curricula in order to improve learner competence and engagement. This session of the ASH Medical Educators Institute will focus on the principles of evaluation and assessment in medical education, will review the major types of evaluation and assessment tools, and will discuss how these tools may be used to design and optimize educational curricula in hematology.

Speakers

  • Dr. Alfred Lee, MD, PhD, Yale School of Medicine

Description

This year's ASH Grassroots Network Session provides a forum for interested members to:
• Hear in-depth analysis of the recent election and learn about potential impacts on health care and hematology by the new Congress and Administration.
• Learn how to participate in ASH’s advocacy efforts, communicate with Congress and the White House, become effective advocates for hematology, and discuss the Society’s legislative and regulatory priorities.
• Discover the Society’s 2020 advocacy accomplishments and get a preview of the Society’s 2021 advocacy agenda.
The featured speaker is Luke Hartig, the Senior Vice President for Product Strategy and Consulting at National Journal, a non-partisan policy news and current events organization in Washington, DC. Mr. Hartig will present a post-election analysis and his predictions about how the outcome of the election may affect issues impacting hematology research and practice, including access to and coverage of health care and funding for biomedical research.

Speakers

  • Moderator: Alan Rosmarin, MD, Chair, ASH Committee on Government Affairs, Deputy Editor, UpToDate, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Keynote Speaker: Luke Hartig, Senior Vice President for Product Strategy and Consulting, National Journal

Description

Treating older adults with acute myeloid leukemia is complicated, as the risk-benefit analysis for intensive and non-intensive therapeutic approaches is shifted compared to that in younger adults, and treatment recommendations must align with patient goals of care, which are by definition individualized. ASH has developed clinical practice guidelines for treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia in older adults that are sensitive to these issues, with approaches defined for real-time conversations that occur between patient and provider. This webinar will highlight the guideline recommendations along with the underlying evidence and rationale for the recommendations.
Educational Objectives:
• Determine the value of intensive and non-intensive chemotherapy in older adults with AML
• For less-intensive therapy approaches, compare the safety and efficacy of monotherapy and combination
• Determine the role of transfusions in palliative care and hospice settings

Speakers

  • Moderator: Mikkael Sekeres, MD, MS, Cleveland Clinic
  • Laura Michaelis, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Hospital
  • Kristin O’Dwyer, MD, University of Rochester, Wilmot Cancer Institute
  • Thomas LeBlanc, MD, MA, MHS, FAAHPM, Duke University School of Medicine

Description

ASH has developed clinical practice guidelines on the use of anticoagulation for prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients with COVID-19. This webinar will highlight the guideline recommendations along with the underlying evidence and rationale for the recommendations.
Educational Objectives:
• Review two case-based presentations on recommendations for the use of anticoagulation to prevent venous thromboembolism in acutely and critically ill patients with COVID-19
• Describe the current evidence, research needs, and ASH plans to update the systematic reviews and recommendations
• Provide an opportunity for Q&A

Speakers

  • Moderator: Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania
  • Robby Nieuwlaat, PhD, MSc McMaster University
  • Deborah Siegal, MD, MSc, University of Ottawa
  • Erik Klok, MD, PhD, Leiden University Medical Center

Description

Individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) are living longer in the United States; however, barriers to receiving quality, comprehensive care for SCD remain, resulting in health care disparities and inequities. COVID-19 has further disrupted care and increased these challenges and mortality. To address these challenges and others, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) recently released a new report entitled Addressing Sickle Cell Disease: A Strategic Plan and Blueprint for Action, which provides recommendations for improving health care for the approximately 100,000 people in the U.S. with SCD.
This briefing will present an overview about
• the current state of SCD during the pandemic;
• a personal story of a young adult’s journey with the disease;
• key findings and recommendations from the NASEM report on SCD;
• and a presentation of proposed policy strategies.
Join us to learn how you can help improve SCD care and outcomes.

Speakers

  • Biree Andemariam, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Sickle Cell Disease Association of America, Inc., University of Connecticut Health
  • Kyle A. Smith, MS, Crescent Foundation
  • Kim Smith-Whitley, MD, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
  • Chancellor Donald, MD, Chair, American Society of Hematology Committee on Practice, Tulane University

Description

Drs. Lachelle Weeks and Joseph Telfair will discuss the topic of implicit bias and healthy equity. Specifically, the speakers will address the grounding and operational definitions of implicit or unconscious bias, how unconscious bias and racism appear in hematology, and actionable recommendations going forward. This webinar is designed to elicit a conversation on this important topic.

Speakers

  • Lachelle Weeks, MD, PhD, Dana Farber Cancer Institute
  • Joseph Telfair, DrPH, MPH, MSW, HonFRSPH, Georgia Southern University
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